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Subj:    Bridge Challenge #9 (S514c)
         From Chapter 8 - "Squeeze Play", page 134

From the book Winning Declarer Play 
              by Dorothy Truscott 
              Published in 1969 by Harper and Row 
 
West
S - J 9 5 4
H - K Q 4 3
D - 9 8 5 4 3
C - 
North
S - A K 8 6
H - 10 9 8 2
D - A
C - Q 7 6 3

South
S - 7
H - A J
D - K Q J 10 7 6
C - A K 8 2

East
S - Q 10 3 2
H - 7 6 5
D - 2
C - J 10 9 5 4

Most squeezes will not operate unless declarer first gives up all tricks he can afford to lose.  In a grand slam, declarer cannot afford to give up any tricks, so this is not a problem in this or the previous hand.

The final contract is 7 NT and the opening lead is the king of hearts.  The grand slam is a lay-down with a normal 3-2 club break.  The opening lead is won by the ace, and a diamond is led to dummy's ace.  A club is returned to the ace, and when West discards a heart it looks as though only twelve tricks are available.  Declarer doesn't turn a hair, however, because he knows there is an automatic double squeeze.  He cashes the other two club honors and all his diamonds.  Just before the last diamond is played the position is:
 
West
S - J 9 5 
H - Q
D -
C -
North
S - A K 8 6
H - 
D - 
C - 

South
S - 7
H - J
D - 7
C - 8

East
S - Q 10 3 
H -
D -
C - J

Now the last diamond is led, and West must throw a spade in order to keep the heart queen.  Dummy discards a spade, and East must also throw a spade in order to keep his club jack.  So North wins the last three tricks with the A K 8 of spades.

In effect, what happened was this.  West was busy protecting hearts.  East was busy protecting clubs.  And there was nobody left to mind the spades.

Some people have the idea that a double squeeze requires a great deal of counting.  Nonsense!  On this hand declarer doesn't count anything except clubs.  He knows from the opening lead that the heart jack is a threat against West.  And he learned from the play that the club eight is a threat against East.  Now he runs all his winners, keeping one eye out for the heart queen and the missing clubs.  If West doesn't throw the heart queen away, and if East doesn't throw two clubs away, dummy's spades must automatically win the last three tricks.

Notice that a double squeeze requires three ingredients: 1. A threat against West.  2. A threat against East.  3. A general threat (in this case the long spades), which can be guarded by eather opponent.  To this extent the double squeeze is slightly more complicated than the simple squeeze, which requires only two ingredients: two threat cards against the same opponent.
 

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This is one example from Dorthy Truscott's book "Winning Declarer Play."  Buy 
the book, read it, and rereat it a dozen times.  I guarantee it will improve 
your bridge game.

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