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Subj:     Bridge Challenge #12 (S517c)
          From Part III - "Problem Hands", page 198

From the book Winning Declarer Play   
              by Dorothy Truscott   
              Published in 1969 by Harper and Row 
 
 
North
S - 8 6 4 2
H - A 4 3
D - K Q J
C - 4 3 2

South
S - A K 5
H - K Q J
D - A 10 9 8
C - A K J

South dealer.  Both Vulnerable

The bidding:     SOUTH     WEST     NORTH     EAST
                 3 NT      Pass     6 NT      Pass
                 Pass      Pass

Opening lead: Heart ten

Your opening bid promises about 25 points, and partner places the contract at six no-trumps.  The heart ten is led.  How do you play?

Answer: You have eleven tricks off the top, and the twelfth trick can come from one of two sources: a successful club finesse or a 3-3 spade break.  The question of which suit to test first is very important.  For example, suppose declarer tries the club finesse first.  If this loses, it is too late to make the contract, even if the spades divide 3-3.

The proper play is to test the spades first, and declarer should start by playing a small spade from both hands.  In this way he retains control of the suit.  Later he will cash the A K of spades, and if the suit breaks 3-3, dummy's eight will provide the twelfth trick.  And if the spades do not break, he will fall back on the club finesse.

Here is the entire hand:
 
 
West
S - Q 10 7
H - 10 9 8 7
D - 5 4 2
C - Q 9 6
North
S - 8 6 4 2
H - A 4 3
D - K Q J
C - 4 3 2

South
S - A K 5
H - K Q J
D - A 10 9 8
C - A K J

East
S - J 9 3
H - 6 5 2
D - 7 6 3
C - 10 8 7 5

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This is one example from Dorthy Truscott's book "Winning Declarer Play."  
Buy the book, read it, and rereat it a dozen times.  I guarantee it will  
improve your bridge game.

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