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Subj:.....Bridge Challenge #14 (S519c)
          From Part III - "Problem Hands", page 220

From the book Winning Declarer Play 
              by Dorothy Truscott 
              Published in 1969 by Harper and Row
 
North
S - J 10
H - 9 8 3
D - A K 8 6 2
C - J 3 2

South
S - Q
H - A 10 2
D - 7 4
C - A K Q 10 9 5 4

South dealer.  Both Vulnerable

The bidding:     SOUTH     WEST     NORTH     EAST
                 1 Club    Pass     1 Diamond Pass
                 3 Clubs   Pass     4 Clubs   Pass
                 5 Blubs   Pass     Pass      Pass 

Opening lead: Diamond queen

West leads the diamond queen against your contract of five clubs.
How do you play this one?

Answer: Ten tricks are easy, and the eleventh can only come from the diamond suit.  To give yourself the maximum chance to establish an extra diamond, you must duck the opening lead.  Here is the entire deal:
 
 
West
S - A 9 8 4
H - Q 7 6 4
D - Q J 10 9
C - 6
North
S - J 10
H - 9 8 3
D - A K 8 6 2
C - J 3 2

South
S - Q
H - A 10 2
D - 7 4
C - A K Q 10 9 5 4

East
S - K 7 6 5 3 2
H - K J 5
D - 5 3
C - 8 7

When the diamond queen holds, let's assume West continues with the jack.  You win with the ace, and ruff a small diamond with a high club.  Now draw trumps, ending in dummy.  The King and eight of diamonds take care of your two heart losers, and the contract is home.

If you win the opening lead, it is impossible to establish the diamonds (unless the suit breaks 3-3), because there are not enough entries to dummy.  By ducking the first diamond, you guarentee the contract whether the diamonds break 3-3 or 4-2.
 

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This is one example from Dorthy Truscott's book "Winning Declarer Play." 
Buy the book, read it, and rereat it a dozen times.  I guarantee it will 
improve your bridge game.

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