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Subj:.....Bridge Challenge #15 (S520c)
          From Part III - "Problem Hands", page 222

From the book Winning Declarer Play 
              by Dorothy Truscott 
              Published in 1969 by Harper and Row
 
North
S - A Q J
H - K 8 6 4
D - K 8 6
C - K 6 2

South
S - K 10 5
H - A J 10 9 2
D - A 9 5
C - A 10

North dealer.  East-West Vulnerable

The bidding:     NORTH     EAST     SOUTH     WEST
                 1 NT      Pass     3 Hearts  Pass
                 4 Hearts  Pass     6 Hearts  Pass
                 Pass      Pass     Pass 

Opening lead: Diamond queen

West leads the diamond queen against six hearts, and there appears to be an obvious diamond loser and a possible trump loser.  You win the first trick with the diamond ace and hopefully cash the king and ace of hearts.  To your annoyance West discards a diamond on the second heart.  Is there still a chance and how do you capitalize on it?

Answer:  Things look black, but you're not down yet.  You still have a chance if East has no more than two diamonds.  What you hope for is something like this:
 
West
S - 7 6 4
H - 7
D - Q J 10 7 4
C - Q 8 4 3
North
S - A Q J
H - K 8 6 4
D - K 8 6
C - K 6 2

South
S - K 10 5
H - A J 10 9 2
D - A 9 5
C - A 10

East
S - 9 8 3 2
H - Q 5 3
D - 3 2
C - J 9 7 5

Cash the ace and king of clubs and ruff dummy's small club.  Now cash the three spades and the diamond king.  The position will be:
 
West
S - 
H - 
D - J 10
C - Q
North
S - 
H - 8 6
D - 8
C - 

South
S - 
H - J 10
D - 9
C - 

East
S - 9
H - Q
D - 
C - J

The stage is now set, and you lead a heart.  East must win with the queen and return a black card, giving you a ruff and a sluff and the contract.
 

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This is one example from Dorthy Truscott's book "Winning Declarer Play." 
Buy the book, read it, and rereat it a dozen times.  I guarantee it will 
improve your bridge game.

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