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Subj:.....Bridge Challenge #16 (S521c)
          From Part III - "Problem Hands", page 236

From the book Winning Declarer Play 
              by Dorothy Truscott 
              Published in 1969 by Harper and Row
 
North
S - 3
H - 8 6 4
D - A J 7 5
C - K Q 10 3 2

South
S - A 5
H - A Q
D - K 3 2
C - A J 9 8 7 6

South dealer.  Both Vulnerable

The bidding:     NORTH     EAST     SOUTH     WEST
                 1 Club    Pass     3 Clubs   Pass
                 6 Clubs   Pass     Pass      Pass

Opening lead: Spade king

You open one club, partner raises to three clubs, and without further ado you bid six clubs.  West leads the spade king, which you win with the ace.  You draw the opponents trump in one round and then ruff your losing spade in dummy.  How do you proceed?

Answer: You can count eleven tricks, so all you need is one extra trick from either diamonds or hearts.  The chances of getting the extra trick from diamonds suit are excellent, provided you don't mind losing one trick in the process - which, of course you don't.  Cash the ace and King of diamonds first and then lead a diamond toward the jack,  This line of play will produce three diamond tricks any time that

     1. West has the queen
     2. The diamonds break 3-3
     3. East has the singleton queen
     4. East has the doubleton queen

And if all these possibilities fail, you can still try the heart finesse as a last resort.  Here is the complete hand:
 
West
S - K Q J 6
H - K 10 3 2
D - 10 9 8 6
C - 4
North
S - 3
H - 8 6 4
D - A J 7 5
C - K Q 10 3 2

South
S - A 5
H - A Q
D - K 3 2
C - A J 9 8 7 6

East
S - 10 9 8 7 4 2
H - J 9 7 5
D - Q 4
C - 5

 
 

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This is one example from Dorthy Truscott's book "Winning Declarer Play." 
Buy the book, read it, and rereat it a dozen times.  I guarantee it will 
improve your bridge game.

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