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Subj:.....Bridge Challenge #17 (S522c)
          From Part III - "Problem Hands", page 248

From the book Winning Declarer Play 
              by Dorothy Truscott 
              Published in 1969 by Harper and Row
 
North
S - K Q 5
H - J 9 6 5 2
D - A 8 3
C - Q J

South
S - A 10 6 4 3 2
H - K 3
D - 
C - A K 7 5 3

East dealer.  Both Vulnerable

The bidding:     EAST      SOUTH     WEST      NORTH
                 1 Heart   1 Spade   Pass      3 Spades
                 Pass      6 Spades  Pass      Pass
                 Pass

Opening lead: Heart four

East opens the bidding with one heart, and you make a conservative overcall of one spade.  When partner jumps to three spades, you become bullish and try six.  This ends the auction, and West leads the four of hearts.  What are your plans for the hand?

Answer: If you think to yourself, "There is no rush to make any plans until I see what happens at trick one," you are a dead duck.

You know West's four of hearts is a singleton.  East is going to play the ace on this trick, and when you follow with the three, East will also know the four is a singleton.  He will return a heart, West will ruff your king, and it will be too late to make any plans, because you are down already.

Here is the complete hand:
 
West
S - 9 8
H - 4
D - 10 9 7 5 4 2
C - 9 6 4 2
North
S - K Q 5
H - J 9 6 5 2
D - A 8 3
C - Q J

South
S - A 10 6 4 3 2
H - K 3
D - 
C - A K 7 5 3

East
S - J 7
H - A Q 10 8 7
D - K Q J 6
C - 10 8

You can probably avert this disaster if you think the situation out before playing from dummy to the first trick.  Now when East plays his heart ace, you smoothly drop the king.  East will almost surely assume his partner started with the doubleton heart 4 3.  Rather than establish dummy's heart jack he will probably shift to the diamond king.  Off goes the heart three on dummy's ace of diamonds, and you have stolen the slam.
 
 

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This is one example from Dorthy Truscott's book "Winning Declarer Play." 
Buy the book, read it, and rereat it a dozen times.  I guarantee it will 
improve your bridge game.

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