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Subj:.....Bridge Challenge #19 (S524c)
          From Part III - "Problem Hands", page 267

From the book Winning Declarer Play 
              by Dorothy Truscott 
              Published in 1969 by Harper and Row
 
North
S - 9
H - A J 9 6 5 4
D - A K
C - J 8 3 2

South
S - A Q 3
H - 2
D - Q J 10 9 8 7
C - Q 7 5

North dealer.  East-West Vulnerable

The bidding:     NORTH     EAST      SOUTH      WEST
                 1 Heart   Pass      2 Diamonds Pass
                 2 Heart   Pass      2 NT       Pass
                 3 Clubs   Pass      3 NT       Pass
                 Pass      Pass

Opening lead: Spade five

West leads the spade five against three no-trump, and East plays the king on dummy's nine.  What's the most practical way to make this contract?

Answer: You actually have nine tricks - six diamonds, two spades, and the ace of hearts.  The diamond suit is blocked, however, which makes the transport-
ation very tricky.  Suppose you win the first trick with spade ace and cash the A K of diamonds.  Now you have to get back to your hand, which is easier said than done.  The opponents may realize by this time that you are planning to run the diamond suit, and once they puts their minds to keeping you out of your hand, you're in trouble.
 
West
S - J 8 7 5 2
H - K Q 10 8
D - 4 2
C - A 9
North
S - 9
H - A J 9 6 5 4
D - A K
C - J 8 3 2

South
S - A Q 3
H - 2
D - Q J 10 9 8 7
C - Q 7 5

East
S - K 10 6 4
H - 7 3
D - 6 5 3
C - K 10 6 4

There is a very practical solution to this transportation problem: Let East hold the first trick with the spade king.  He will almost certainly return a second spade, and now you can discard the A K of diamonds on the spades.  With the diamond suit unblocked you run nine tricks with ease.
 
 

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This is one example from Dorthy Truscott's book "Winning Declarer Play." 
Buy the book, read it, and rereat it a dozen times.  I guarantee it will 
improve your bridge game.

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