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Subj:.....Bridge Challenge #20 (S525c)
          From Part III - "Problem Hands", page 269

From the book Winning Declarer Play 
              by Dorothy Truscott 
              Published in 1969 by Harper and Row 
 
North
S - Q 6 4 2
H - Q J 10
D - K Q 5
C - A Q 2

South
S - 5
H - A K 9 5 3
D - A J 10 3 2
C - J 4

North dealer.  Neither Vulnerable

The bidding:     NORTH     EAST      SOUTH     WEST
                 1 NT      Pass      3 Hearts  Pass
                 4 Heart   Pass      6 Hearts  Pass
                 Pass      Pass

Opening lead: Spade jack

Against six hearts West leads the spade jack, and when this holds the trick, he continues with the ten, which you ruff.  (East contributes the seven, then the three.)  What is your plan for the hand?

Answer:  The most obvious plan is to draw the trumps, cash the diamonds, and try the club finesse.  This method will succeed about 50 percent of the time.

A better plan, however is to aim for a dummy reversal.  After ruffing the second spade, cash the queen and jack of hearts.  If everyone follows you ruff a third spade with the heart ace, return to dummy with the diamond king, and ruff the last spade with the heart king.  Now go over to the club ace and draw the one outstanding trump with dummy's heart ten.  As you have no more hearts in your hand, you shed a club on this trick and claim the balance.

Of course, if one opponent fails to follow on the second round of trumps you have to abandon the dummy reversal idea, because dummy's trumps are not long enough to handle a 4-1 break.  In this case you revert to the obvious method of drawing all the trumps, and you sink or swim with the club finesse.

Here is the complete deal:
 
West
S - J 10 9 8
H - 8 7 4
D - 8 4
C - 9 7 6 5
North
S - Q 6 4 2
H - Q J 10
D - K Q 5
C - A Q 2

South
S - 5
H - A K 9 5 3
D - A J 10 3 2
C - J 4

East
S - A K 7 3
H - 6 2
D - 9 7 6
C - K 10 8 3

A dummy reversal (see Chapter 7) often seems like an upside-down way to play a hand.  But it is clearly the superior plan here, because it eliminates the rish of the club finesse.
 
 

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This is one example from Dorthy Truscott's book "Winning Declarer Play." 
Buy the book, read it, and rereat it a dozen times.  I guarantee it will 
improve your bridge game.

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